2015 AIA Webinar Series

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Overview

2015 Webinar Series: Supporting Children Affected by Prenatal Substance Exposure

The 2015 Webinar Series has concluded. Handouts for each of the sessions and recordings of sessions 2-4 are available for viewing.

1) Long-term Effects of Prenatal Substance Exposure
Ira Chasnoff, M.D.
March 16, 2015

2) Sustaining the Promise of Child Well-being for Infants and Toddlers Born Prenatally Drug Exposed: Strategies, Core Components and Long-term Outcomes of the Miami Community Collaboration Model
Lynne Katz, Ed.D.
April 14, 2015

3) Strengthening the Parent-Child Attachment in Families Affected by Substance Use
Karen Gould, M.S.W., L.C.S.W. and Beth Marron, M.Ed., L.I.C.S.W.
May 12, 2015

4) Shame, Guilt and Fear: Understanding and Working with the Complex Feelings of Mothers of Substance-exposed Newborns
Eda Spielman, Psy.D. and Amy R. Sommer, L.I.C.S.W.
June 9, 2015

For additional information, contact aiarc@berkeley.edu.

 

Webinar 1

Long-term Effects of Prenatal Substance Exposure

Ira Chasnoff, M.D.
March 16 , 10:00-11:30 am (Pacific) – COMPLETED

Children prenatally exposed to legal and illicit substances make up an ever-growing portion of the United States’ population of children.  The most recent data from the National Institute on Drug Abuse suggest that over 1 million children per year are exposed to alcohol and illicit substances during gestation.  The health consequences for these children are enormous, but the long-term implications for behavior and learning are even greater.  This session will explore the biological factors that affect the ultimate development of alcohol- and drug-exposed children as they reach adolescence and the impact on development, learning, and achievement as the young people seek independence. (No recording of this presentation is available.)

Download the presentation slides [PDF]

PRESENTER BIO

IraChasnoff

Ira Chasnoff, M.D., an award-winning author, researcher and lecturer, is president of NTI Upstream and a Professor of Clinical Pediatrics at the University of Illinois College Of Medicine in Chicago. He is one of the nation’s leading researchers in the field of child development and the effects of maternal alcohol and drug use on the newborn infant and child.  His research projects include a study of the long-term cognitive, behavioral and educational developmental effects of prenatal exposure to alcohol, cocaine, and other drugs; strategies for screening pregnant women for substance use; the effects on birth outcome of prenatal treatment and counseling for pregnant drug abusers; the effectiveness of both outpatient and residential treatment programs for pregnant drug abusers; and innovative treatment approaches for children affected by prenatal exposure to alcohol or illicit drugs.  Since 2002, Dr. Chasnoff has been working with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, leading one of four national centers for research into innovative treatment for children with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

Dr. Chasnoff’s most recent work focuses on community approaches to the integration of behavioral health services into primary health care for women and children and the occurrence of co-occurring mental health disorders in children who have been exposed to alcohol, methamphetamine, cocaine, and other drugs.  As an extension of these efforts, Dr. Chasnoff is working with communities and states to develop integrated systems of prevention and care for children and families in the child welfare system affected by substance abuse. In addition, Dr. Chasnoff has served as the Chair of the National Medical Task Force on Methamphetamine, Children, and Families for the Congressionally authorized National Alliance on Model State Drug Laws and served as the Chair of the State Task Force on FASD for the State of Illinois.

Dr. Chasnoff  is the author of numerous articles on the effects of alcohol and other drug use on pregnancy and on the long-term cognitive, behavioral, and learning outcomes of prenatally exposed children.  He has authored seven books, one of which, Drugs, Alcohol, Pregnancy, and Parenting, received the Book of the Year Award from the American Journal of Nursing.  He is also a regular contributor to Psychology Today, writing about high-risk children and their families.

 

Webinar 2

Sustaining the Promise of Child Well-being for Infants and Toddlers Born Prenatally Drug Exposed: Strategies, Core Components and Long-term Outcomes of the Miami Community Collaboration Model

Lynne Katz, Ed.D.
April 14, 10:00-11:30 am (Pacific) – COMPLETED

For close to three decades, a research-grounded university/juvenile court/child welfare/community provider partnership has come together to provide quality evidence-based interventions for families impacted by substance use and co-occurring risk factors and their young children ages 0-3. Creating effective interventions to support permanency and promote school readiness for this high-risk population takes planning and community buy-in supported by implementation research and cross-systems integration. This webinar will provide a roadmap of strategies which can now be utilized by all communities.

Download the presentation slides [PDF]

PRESENTER BIO

Lynne Katz

Lynne Katz, Ed.D., is a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology with Secondary Appointments in Pediatrics and Education at the University of Miami. She is the Director of the university’s Linda Ray Intervention Center for high risk children ages 0-3 who were born prenatally drug exposed and/or were victims of child maltreatment. Since 1993, she has coordinated the program’s comprehensive early intervention services for over 1000 infants and toddlers and their families.  She was elected to the Wall of Honor of the Miami Juvenile Court for her work, as well as being a recipient of the Eleventh Judicial Circuit Leadership Award and the Regional Child Welfare Outstanding Community Partner Award for leadership in early childhood and parenting program collaborations and research with the Juvenile Court.  She has been an advocate of evidence-based services for families for over two decades and has researched quality early education programs, early intervention outcomes and parenting services.  She also serves as a peer reviewer for the Bureau of Justice Programs and is a member of the National Advisory Board for Children and Family Futures Prevention and Family Recovery project. She is co-author of the book Child-centered practices for the courtroom and community: A Guide to working effectively with young children and their families in the child welfare system.

CONTINUING EDUCATION UNITS

In partnership with the Association for Advanced Training in the Behavioral Sciences, the National AIA Resource Center is pleased to offer CEUs for this training.

To register for CEU course credit, please go: Sustaining the Promise of Child Well-being for Infants and Toddlers Born Prenatally Drug Exposed
http://www.aatbs.com/ce_info.asp?id=638

If you have any questions, please contact AATBS directly by email, ceinfo@aatbs.com, or phone 800-472-1931 during business hours of Monday through Friday 8:00am-5:00pm (PST).

 

Webinar 3

Strengthening the Parent-Child Attachment in Families Affected by Substance Use

Karen Gould, M.S.W., L.C.S.W. and Beth Marron, M.Ed., L.I.C.S.W.
May 12, 10:00-11:30 am (Pacific) – COMPLETED

This webinar will explore how young children are impacted by prenatal substance exposure.  In this exploration, providers will learn how to work with the parent-child dyad to forge a strong attachment and mitigate symptoms of parental substance use.  The principles of Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP) will be examined. Additionally, this webinar will provide information on the use of Reflective Function (RF) in the treatment of young children and their families. RF supports the caregiver in managing emotions effectively so that (s)he is better attuned to his or her own needs and can increase attentiveness to the child’s needs and physical and emotional safety.

Download the presentation slides [PDF]

PRESENTER BIO

Karen-Gould

Karen Gould, M.S.W., L.C.S.W., is the Director of Early Childhood Trauma Services at the Institute for Health and Recovery (IHR).  Her work focuses on issues of traumatic stress in young children whose parents are in recovery from substance use and/or co-occurring disorders. She directed Building Resilience Through Intervention: Growing Healthier Together (Project BRIGHT) for the Institute for Health and Recovery in Cambridge, Massachusetts.  Project BRIGHT was a three-year program funded through the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration/ Center for Mental Health Services that addresses traumatic stress in children ages birth to five and their parents in recovery from substance use disorders and co-occurring disorders at eight Family Residential Treatment programs across Massachusetts.  From 2006-2010, Ms. Gould was the Director of the Families Living Together Project, a five-year CSAT Homeless Addictions Treatment grant.  From 1998-2004, Ms. Gould was the Director of the Women Embracing Life and Living (WELL Child) Project, one of four sites of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration’s Women, Co-Occurring Disorders and Violence Study. Ms. Gould received her MSW in social work from Simmons College School of Social Work in Boston, MA, and is licensed as a clinical social worker in Massachusetts. She has experience providing mental health services with children, adolescents and families.  In addition to experience with program development, and training, she has a private practice and consults to the Boston Public Schools and Lynn Public Schools.

Beth Marron

Beth Marron, M.Ed., L.I.C.S.W., is a Child Clinician at the Institute for Health and Recovery in Cambridge, MA. Ms. Marron delivers attachment-based interventions for infants, children and parents. She has practiced in outpatient and residential substance abuse treatment settings, and also at a child mental health clinic. Additionally, she has provided technical assistance training to practitioners on clinical interventions. Her particular areas of interest include attachment-based interventions and treatment for substance-using parents and their infants and children. In her previous role as a Parent-Child Specialist, Beth worked with residential substance abuse treatment programs and homeless family shelters to assist in developing and supporting parenting and family services by providing training, technical aid, and assistance to programs; and through co-facilitation of a 17 week parenting curriculum, Nurturing Program for Families in Substance Abuse Treatment and Recovery. Ms. Marron also co-facilitated an 8-week group for children ages 6-12, as well as Parent Time: Supporting Yourself and Your Child, an 8-week, group-based curriculum for parents concerned about their teen’s alcohol and/or drug use.

Besides her work at the Institute for Health and Recovery, Beth is a part-time staff member of the Rice Center for Young Children and Families at the Boston Institute for Psychotherapy.

Ms. Marron received her M.S.W. from Simmons College and her M.Ed. from Lesley University.

CONTINUING EDUCATION UNITS

In partnership with the Association for Advanced Training in the Behavioral Sciences, the National AIA Resource Center is pleased to offer CEUs for this training.

To register for CEU course credit, please go to: Strengthening the Parent-Child Attachment in Families Affected by Substance Use
http://www.aatbs.com/ce_info.asp?id=639

If you have any questions, please contact AATBS directly by email, ceinfo@aatbs.com, or phone 800-472-1931 during business hours of Monday through Friday 8:00am-5:00pm (PST).

 

Webinar 4

webinar-4-header

Eda Spielman, Psy.D. and Amy R. Sommer, L.I.C.S.W.
June 9, 10:00-11:30 am (Pacific)

Pregnancy, birth and early mothering of a substance-exposed newborn are experiences of emotional complexity.  Feelings of guilt, shame and fear are commonplace and often underlie the external behaviors we encounter with mothers with substance-use disorders: secrecy, shifting truths, avoidance and denial. This webinar will draw from our experiences of closely listening to the voices of mothers in Project NESST (Newborns Exposed to Substances: Support and Therapy).  We will share findings from our qualitative interview study and our clinical work to illustrate the challenging emotional landscape and suggest ways to move forward in psychotherapeutic work with mothers in recovery.

Download the presentation slides [PDF]

PRESENTER BIO

Eda Spielman

Eda Spielman, Psy.D. is the clinical director of the Center for Early Relationship Support (CERS®) and faculty at the Infant-Parent Training Institute of Jewish Family and Children’s Service of Greater Boston. She holds a certificate in Infant Mental Health and came to JF&CS to develop Early Connections, a program of home-based mother-baby psychotherapy for dyads facing early relationship challenges. She is currently involved in two projects at CERS® in support of families facing the dual challenges of early parenting and substance use recovery. For the development of Project NESST (Newborns Exposed to Substances: Support and Therapy), she led a year-long needs assessment process that included a qualitative interview study of the experiences of 21 mothers of substance-exposed newborns. She taught a clinical integrative seminar at MSPP for many years; has served as a consultant to Early Intervention, Early Head Start, and Healthy Families; and is in private practice in Newton with a specialty in issues of pregnancy and parenting. Dr. Spielman’s recent publications focus on clinical experience using Child-Parent Psychotherapy for families in substance use recovery, post-adoption depression and the outcomes and process of parent-infant psychotherapy.

Amy Sommer.fw

Amy R. Sommer, L.I.C.S.W. is a clinical coordinator at the Center for Early Relationship Support (CERS ®), a center of excellence for direct services, training, supervision, and consultation with a focus on the earliest infant-parent relationships. CERS® is housed at Jewish Family & Children’s Service of Greater Boston. Ms. Sommer’s expertise is in attachment-based interventions for infants and parents. She has practiced and supervised in home-based, healthcare, and addiction treatment settings; and she has provided training to local, national, and international audiences on dyadic work through a number of lenses. Recently, Ms. Sommer has focused on training providers from medical, social service, and graduate programs on supporting families impacted by addiction. She also has experience both providing, as well as training others, in interventions for perinatal depression and program evaluation.

CONTINUING EDUCATION UNITS

In partnership with the Association for Advanced Training in the Behavioral Sciences, the National AIA Resource Center is pleased to offer CEUs for this training.

To register for CEU course credit, please go to: Shame, Guilt and Fear: Understanding and Working with the Complex Feelings of Mothers of Substance-exposed Newborns
http://www.aatbs.com/ce_info.asp?id=653

If you have any questions, please contact AATBS directly by email, ceinfo@aatbs.com, or phone 800-472-1931 during business hours of Monday through Friday 8:00am-5:00pm (PST).