2013 AIA Webinar Series

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2013 AIA Webinar Series

Overview

The National AIA Resource Center hosted two webinars in 2013.  Recordings are available for viewing under the webinar tabs.

1) Reaching, Engaging, and Retaining Women in HIV Care: What We Know, Don’t Know, and Need to Resolve
Presenter: Victoria A Cargill, M.D., M.S.C.E.
Date: January 23, 2013

2) Long-term Effects of Prenatal Substance Exposure on Children
Presenter: Barry Lester, Ph.D.
Date: February 26, 2013

 

Webinar 1

Reaching, Engaging, and Retaining Women in HIV Care: What We Know, Don’t Know, and Need to Resolve
Presenter: Victoria A Cargill, M.D., M.S.C.E.
Director of Minority Health and Clinical Studies
Office of AIDS Research
Date: January 23, 2013

This 90-minute session examined the many challenges faced by providers caring for women and children, disproportionately of color, who are living with HIV.  The challenges in managing today’s patients, including complicated familial and social issues; co-morbid infections; and medication and adherence fatigue, were discussed.  Models of effective care and engagement, knowledge gaps in clinical practice, and suggestions for how to proceed in the absence of evidence were presentedPresentation Slides [PDF]

Viewing the training is free, but you have the option to purchase 2 CE units. Click here for more information.

 

Webinar 2

Long-term Effects of Prenatal Substance Exposure on Children
Presenter: Barry Lester, Ph.D.
Founding Director of the Center for the Study of Children at Risk
Brown University Alpert Medical School and Women and Infants Hospital
Date: February 26, 2013, 10:00-11:30 am PST

This 90-minute webinar reviewed outcomes of longitudinal studies of children with prenatal drug exposure, and examined how the combination of prenatal exposure and environmental adversity can result in the development of behavior disorders, including early onset of adolescent substance use. A new model examining prenatal exposure within the broader context of the wear and tear on the body’s response to stress was presented. Presentation slides [PDF]

Additional Information:

Viewing the training is free, but you have the option to purchase 2 CE units. Click here for more information.

 

Presenter Bios

Presenter Bios

Victoria Cargill, M.D., M.S.C.E., completed her medical education at Boston University School of Medicine, her residency at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital of Harvard University, receiving many awards for clinical excellence, and compassionate care.  After completing an Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship in Clinical Epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania, she was recruited to Case Western Reserve University, serving as teacher, clinician and researcher, achieving the rank of Professor of Medicine — the second African-American woman to do so in the history of the medical school. In 1998 she was recruited by Dr. William Paul to the Office of AIDS Research where she serves as the Director of Minority Research and Clinical Studies.  In that role she works with a number of groups including academicians, community groups, advocates, researchers and federal colleagues.  In addition to reviewing the NIH HIV research portfolio with respect to racial and ethnic minorities and health disparities, she is a practicing physician, caring for people living with HIV infection in Southeast Washington, DC, and teaches community based research and community engagement at the University of Pennsylvania Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars program.

Barry M. Lester, Ph.D., Professor of Psychiatry & Human Behavior, Professor of Pediatrics and founding director of the Center for the Study of Children at Risk, Brown University Alpert Medical School and Women and Infants Hospital. The focus of Dr. Lester’s research is on mechanisms and processes that determine developmental outcome in children at risk due to biological and/or social factors. He has studied the effects of prematurity, growth restriction, malnutrition, prenatal substance exposure and maternal psychotropic medication during pregnancy using longitudinal, multisite and cross-cultural designs. His work has shown that biological factors do leave their footprint on later development and that environmental factors can exaggerate or lessen the impact of biological insults. Dr. Lester’s current work includes study of the molecular basis of behavioral development through epigenetic changes that result from prenatal insults and environmental adversity. At the Center for the Study of Children at Risk many of these research findings are translated into assessment and treatment programs. Dr. Lester has served on NIH study sections, the NIH National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse, the NIH Director’s Pioneer Award Program and the College of the Center for Scientific Review at the NIH. He is past president of the International Association for Infant Mental Health and the author of more than 200 scientific publications and 16 edited volumes.