2011 AIA Webinar Series

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1. Assessing and Intervening in the Home with Victims of Intimate Partner Violence

2. Assessing for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders in Children

3. The Effects of Stress on Parenting and Related Child Outcomes in Families Living with HIV

4. Addressing Poverty as a Risk Factor in Child Neglect

5. Understanding Assessment, Diagnosis and Treatment of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

Webinar 1


Assessing and Intervening in the Home with Victims of Intimate Partner Violence

PRESENTERS: Carla Smith Stover, PhD and Phyllis Sharps, PhD, RN, FAAN
DATE: Tuesday, June 7, 2011

Experts in the field of intimate partner violence will discuss best practices for integrating intimate partner violence screening and intervention practices with home visiting services. Special attention will be paid to increasing practitioner safety when there is violence in the home, as well as navigating assessment and intervention when the perpetrator is present.

Download the presentation slides [PDF]

 

Webinar 2


Assessing for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders in Children

PRESENTERS: Catherine Hargrove, JD and Cecily Hardin, LCSW
DATE: Wednesday, July 13, 2011

Estimates suggest that nearly 70% of children in foster care are affected by fetal alcohol exposure to some degree. While only medical personnel can provide a formal diagnosis of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, this training will educate human service workers about key symptoms and characteristics of children with a Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder to streamline early diagnosis and care.

Download the presentation slides [PDF]

Additional Handouts:

Additional information can be found at the SAMHSA Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Center for Excellence web site.

 

Webinar 3


The Effects of Stress on Parenting and Related Child Outcomes in Families Living with HIV 

PRESENTERS: Lisa Armistead, PhD and Debra Murphy, PhD
DATE: Thursday, August 18, 2011

When a parent is diagnosed with HIV, the entire family is affected in myriad ways. This training will review the findings of prominent national studies regarding the impacts of HIV diagnosis-related family stressors on parents and their children, and suggest interventions that may mitigate some of these effects.

Download the presentation slides

 

Webinar 4


Addressing Poverty as a Risk Factor in Child Neglect

PRESENTERS: Sania Metzger, Esq. and Aimee Durfee, JD
DATE: Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Children who live in families with annual incomes less than $15,000 are 7 times more likely to be neglected. Unemployment, single parenthood, limited access to health care and housing instability all contribute to child neglect. This training will provide a range of economic success strategies that practitioners can utilize to help their families work towards financial stability, despite the nation’s economic downturn.

Download the presentation slides

 

Webinar 5


Understanding Assessment, Diagnosis and Treatment of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders 

PRESENTER: Claire Coles, PhD
DATE: Tuesday, September 27, 2011

The Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Reauthorization Act of 2010 (P.L. 111-320) now requires health care providers involved in the delivery or care of infants with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) to notify child protective services. A safety plan must subsequently be developed for these infants.

Download the presentation slides [PDF]

 

Presenter Bios

Presenter Bios

Assessing and Intervening in the Home with Victims of Intimate Partner Violence

Carla Smith Stover, PhD
Dr. Carla Smith Stover is a licensed clinical psychologist and Assistant Professor at the Yale University Child Study Center. She has extensive clinical experience with families impacted by domestic violence, including police-mental health collaboration, early intervention, and longer term evidence-based treatments, such as TF-CBT and child-parent psychotherapy. She conducts program evaluation research on engagement and treatment strategies for children and families exposed to trauma and domestic violence.

Phyllis Sharps, PhD, RN, FAAN
As an expert in maternal and child health nursing, a researcher and a mentor to the next generations of Johns Hopkins nurses, Dr. Phyllis Sharps works at the forefront of community and public health nursing and at the interface of mental and physical health. In addition to serving as Chair of the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing Department of Community Public Health, she is also the Director of three health and wellness centers operated by the School, provides care in a Baltimore shelter for homeless battered women and their children and conducts ongoing community-based, participatory research. With a $3.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Sharps is testing the Domestic Violence Enhanced Visitation Program (DOVE), a promising intervention to keep abused women and babies safe from intimate partner violence.

Assessing for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders in Children

Cecily Hardin, LCSW
Cecily Hardin has been affiliated with the Child Guidance Center in Jacksonville, Florida, since 1989. Former positions include Director of Intensive Crisis Counseling and Director of Family Casework Services. Cecily is now coordinator of the Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Project. Cecily recently completed training in child-parent psychotherapy through the National Child Traumatic Stress Network.

Catherine Hargrove, JD
Ms. Hargrove has been a Technical Assistance Liaison with the SAMHSA FASD Center for Excellence for six years where her work focuses on the screening, diagnosis and intervention services for children and families. She is responsible for the management of the FASD diagnostic and intervention subcontracts. This includes providing technical assistance to the subcontractors to assist them in achieving their outcomes; assisting subcontractors in the utilization of the diagnostic and intervention database; organizing, planning and implementing technical assistance and trainings for subcontractors including, but not limited to screening, FASD diagnostic evaluations, interventions for children diagnosed with an FASD, FASD knowledge, and sustainability; providing support for the Diagnostic Learning Community; and identifying special issues related to the improvement of the FASD screening, diagnostic and intervention processes that help to advance FASD Center goals and enrich the field.

The Effects of Stress on Parenting and Related Child Outcomes in Families Living with HIV

Lisa Armistead, PhD 
Over the past several years, Dr. Armistead has investigated the impact of various family stressors on child and adolescent functioning. More recently, her research focus has narrowed to the intersection of HIV and families. In particular, she investigates the impact of maternal HIV infection on children. She has conducted this work domestically with African American families and internationally in South Africa. Through this research, she and her colleagues have identified several family process variables that serve as mechanisms through which a mother’s illness affects her child. The second focus of her recent research is the prevention of HIV via family-based methods. She helped create a parenting-based intervention for families of 9-12 year old African American children, The Parents Matter! Program. The Parents Matter! Program provides parents with tools to keep children on a healthy trajectory and free of HIV and other STDs.

Debra Murphy, PhD 
Debra A. Murphy is a Research Psychologist and Director of the Health Risk Reduction Projects within UCLA ISAP. She has conducted HIV/AIDS behavioral research on children, adolescents, adults, and families over the past 19 years. Dr. Murphy is currently Principal Investigator on two NIMH-funded R01s. The first is to assess the impact of maternal HIV/AIDS on late adolescent/early adult children in what will be a 15-year longitudinal study, as she has followed these families since the children were 6 to 11 years of age. The second is to test the preliminary efficacy of a parenting intervention for HIV-infected mothers with well children age 6 to 14 years old. Overall, she has been the P.I. on nine federally funded grants and three state funded grants, as well as a Co-investigator on eighteen federally funded projects. Prior to coming to UCLA, she was the Associate Director for the Center for AIDS Intervention in Wisconsin and Co-Investigator on a series of federal grants focused on outcome evaluations of HIV behavioral risk-reduction interventions.

Addressing Poverty as a Risk Factor in Child Neglect

Sania Metzger, Esq. 
Sania Metzger is currently the Director of Special Projects at the Community Service Society New York. She was previously the Director of policy for the Annie E. Casey Foundation/Casey Family Services. An attorney, she served on the Casey Policy and Communications Strategy Group, the Child Welfare Strategy Group, and the Alliance for Racial Equity, working to influence and track child welfare policy at local, state and federal levels. Metzger worked for the New York State Legislature for 11 years as legislative counsel to Assemblyman Roger Green, then chair of the Standing Committee on Children and Families.

Aimee Durfee, JD
In her position at the United Way (based in Vallejo), Aimee works with agencies in Napa and Solano counties to develop and fund new collaborative solutions to community problems in the areas of income, education and health. Through her career experience at numerous legal, policy and direct service nonprofits, she has expertise in law, workforce/economic development, employment/labor, public benefits and women’s economic self-sufficiency issues. In her role at United Way she provides technical assistance, fundraising support and facilitation to United Way’s SparkPoint projects, which are working to help families build income and assets, improve credit and reduce debt. Before coming to United Way in 2007, Aimee worked as an Advice and Counsel Attorney at the Transgender Law Center. Prior to that, she was a Program Manager at the Insight Center for Community Economic Development, where she led Californians for Family Economic Self-Sufficiency (CFESS), a statewide policy initiative. In this position, she created coalitions to pass state and local legislation related to welfare reform, wrote/edited numerous major reports on the Self-Sufficiency Standard, and served as spokesperson and coordinator of press events around the state on poverty issues.