2009 AIA Webinar Series

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1. African American Women Affected by HIV/AIDS

  • Part I: Revisiting Cultural Competence: New Evidence Calls for New Paradigms
  • Part II: Mother-Daughter Talk: An Exploration of Intergenerational Concerns

2. Promoting Change and Growth in Highly Resistant Clients

  • Part I: Preventing or Resolving Client Resistance
  • Part II: Managing Critical Junctures in the Counseling Dialogue

Topic 1

African American Women Affected by HIV/AIDS

Part I: Revisiting Cultural Competence: New Evidence Calls for New Paradigms 
PRESENTER: Dorie J. Gilbert, PhD, Associate Professor of Social Work/Faculty Affiliate, Center for African & African American Studies, University of Texas at Austin
DATE: Friday, May 1, 2009

HIV/AIDS trends have shifted, and AIDS is now a leading cause of death in African American women aged 25-34. This training will highlight the most recent data documenting the complex reasons for this trend and introduce five paradigm shifts in cultural competence needed if human service workers are to make an impact on health disparities. The session will include specific techniques for integrating the new meanings of cultural competence into case management and service delivery practices.

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Download the presentation slides [PDF]

Part II: Mother-Daughter Talk: An Exploration of Intergenerational Concerns 
PRESENTER: Dorie J. Gilbert, PhD, Associate Professor of Social Work/Faculty Affiliate, Center for African & African American Studies, University of Texas at Austin
DATE: Tuesday, May 12, 2009

Mother-Daughter Talk, developed by Dr. Gilbert, is an in-depth investigation into the lives of young African American girls whose mothers live with HIV/AIDS. This training will address intergenerational dynamics and communication, silence around sexuality, fragmented relationships, young girls’ risk and resiliency, the challenges of stigma and disclosure and gaps in knowledge, particularly for families in distressed communities. Practical applications of the intervention (e.g., family-based projects, methods for fostering communication in early childhood about sexual health education) will also be discussed.

speakerListen to this presentation (90 minutes) [MP3 format]
Download the presentation slides [PDF]

 

Topic 2

Promoting Change and Growth in Highly Resistant Clients

Part I: Preventing or Resolving Client Resistance 
PRESENTER: Clifton Mitchell, PhD, Licensed Psychologist; Professor of Counseling, East Tennessee State University
DATE: Tuesday, June 23, 2009

A strong desire to help clients, coupled with the difficulties inherent in promoting change, can leave human service professionals feeling frustrated and uncertain. This practical seminar will offer an innovative model of understanding and managing resistance that can improve therapeutic skills, reduce practitioner stress and enhance movement in the most challenging clients. Basic principles and effective techniques presented are applicable across a wide array of clients and problems and can be integrated with all theoretical approaches.

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Download the presentation slides [PDF]

Part II: Managing Critical Junctures in the Counseling Dialogue
PRESENTER: Clifton Mitchell, PhD, Licensed Psychologist; Professor of Counseling, East Tennessee State University
DATE: Wednesday, July 8, 2009

This seminar will address common mistakes human service professionals make that foster client resistance and impede change, with a focus on two frequent challenges in client-practitioner interactions: the therapeutic utility of asking questions and the management of  “I don’t know” responses. Specific approaches and techniques that respect cultural differences will be presented with particular attention given to utilizing the inherent power of language to circumvent resistance and overcome impasses.

speakerListen to this presentation (90 minutes) [MP3 format]
Download the presentation slides [PDF]

 

Presenter Bios

Presenter Bios

African American Women Affected by HIV/AIDS

GilbertDorie J. Gilbert, PhD
Dr. Dorie Gilbert is Associate Professor of Social Work and a faculty affiliate of the Center for African & African American Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. In addition, she is a Visiting Research Scholar at the University of California at San Francisco, Center for AIDS Prevention Studies. Dr. Gilbert’s scholarly work investigates the mental health, behavioral and social consequences of structurally-imposed stigma on vulnerable populations, with an emphasis on HIV/AIDS prevention for African American women. As a Research Associate with the Institute for the Advanced Study of Black Family Life in Oakland, CA, Dr. Gilbert is certified in the African-Centered Behavior Change Model, a culturally congruent model based on the principle of re-instilling traditional African and African American cultural values into women to enhance health promotion behavior. As such, Dr. Gilbert’s work is uniquely centered on advocating for prevention programs which emphasize African-centered philosophies of health promotion and disease prevention. Her research interests also extend to HIV prevention work in Ghana, West Africa.

Dr. Gilbert is co-editor of the book, African-American Women and HIV/AIDS: Critical Responses, a multidisciplinary volume written by African American female contributors from across the country representing the fields of social work, psychology, nursing, theology and public health. She has received National Institute of Health and university funding to study the impact of cultural mistrust on antiretroviral medication adherence, life experiences of women living with HIV, AIDS service utilization among African Americans, and the psychosocial concerns of HIV-positive parents with latency-age children. Her current project, Project Mother-Daughter Talk, involves in-depth interviews with 12-16 year-old African American daughters whose mothers are living with HIV/AIDS. Her publications related to HIV/AIDS and vulnerable populations have appeared in journals and edited books. Additionally, Dr. Gilbert is co-editor of the Journal of HIV/AIDS and Social Services.

Dr. Gilbert has served as a consultant on several community-based funded projects and has participated in church outreach and HIV/AIDS Town Hall meetings to address HIV incidence rates in Austin’s Black community.

Promoting Change and Growth in Highly Resistant Clients

Clifton MitchellClifton Mitchell, PhD
Dr. Clifton Mitchell, a licensed psychologist, has a love for teaching and over 20 years experience as a trainer and keynote speaker. He delivers practical information in a uniquely entertaining, fast-paced style that is filled with examples from his years of experience in mental health. For the past ten years, he has studied and presented seminars on methods for dealing with resistance in therapy. In his book, Effective Techniques for Dealing with Highly Resistant Clients, he presents the best cutting-edge approaches available for managing resistance. He has also been the keynote speaker at conventions and has taught hundreds of businesses, leadership groups and civic organizations effective techniques for improving communication and for creating change through the precise use of language. He has published in numerous professional journals, including the Journal of Personality Assessment, Perceptual and Motor Skills, Psychology and Education, Journal of Psychological Type, The Professional School Counselor and The Advocate. His research includes investigations of subliminal message tapes, stress and coping, PMS, personality types, legal and ethical issues in counseling and resistance. His ideas and writings have also been published in Men’s Health Today and Barron’s Financial Weekly. Dr. Mitchell is currently a professor of counseling at East Tennessee State University in Johnson City, Tennessee, where he received the Teacher of the Year award in 2002.