Shared Family Care

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Shared Family Care 

Shared Family Care, also known as whole family foster care, refers to a situation in which an entire family is temporarily placed in the home of a host family. The host family is trained to mentor and support the parents as they develop the skills and supports necessary to care for their children independently.

Publications & Resources

Publications & Resources

  • The following 7.5 minute video designed for child welfare and agency directors, Shared Family Care: Creating families through community partners (2003), provides a brief overview of the key elements of Shared Family Care (SFC). Highlighting the FamiliesFirst Shared Family Care program in Contra Costa County, California, the video includes VIP testimonials about the benefits and cost-effectiveness of SFC. It also illustrates how SFC fits into California’s overall child welfare redesign plan, sharing common elements such as: community partnerships, engaging families, and using teams in decision making.

 

  • Barth, R. & Price, A. (2006). Shared Family Care: Evidence from implementing an innovative child protection and family preservation program. In H. Ward (Ed.), Promoting the well-being of vulnerable children. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.
  • Price, A. & Schmidbauer, S. (2003). Parenting immersion through shared family care. The Source, 12(2), 21-24. [PDF]
  • Price, A. & Wichterman, L. (2003). Shared Family Care: Fostering the whole family to promote safety and stability. Journal of Family Social Work, Special Issue on Child & Family Well-Being, 7(2), 35-54. [PDF]
  • Shared Family Care: A Brief Overview. (2003). National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center, University of California at Berkeley. [PDF]
  • Clovis, C., Price, A., & Wichterman, L. (2002). Annual report on Shared Family Care: Progress & lessons learned (June 2001 to May 2002). Berkeley, CA: National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center, University of California at Berkeley. [PDF]
  • Shared Family Care fact sheet. (2002). National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center, University of California at Berkeley. [PDF]
  • Simmel, C. & Price, A. (2002). The shared family care demonstration project: Challenges of implementing and evaluating a community-based project. Children and Youth Services Review, Special Issue on Child Welfare Evaluation, 24(6-7), 455-470.
  • Guarino, J.E. & Price, A. (2001). Annual report on Shared Family Care: Progress and lessons learned (June 2000 to May 2001). Berkeley, CA: National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center, University of California at Berkeley. [PDF]
  • Barth, R.P., Price, A., & Simmel, C. (2000). Caring for the whole family to keep the family whole. Children’s Voice, 9(1), 24-27.
  • Simmel, C. & Price, A. (2000). Annual report on Shared Family Care: Progress and lessons learned (June 1999 to July 2000). Berkeley, CA: National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center, University of California at Berkeley. [PDF]
  • Barth, R.P. & Price, A. (1999). Shared Family Care: Providing services to parents and children placed together in out-of-home care. Child Welfare, 78(1), 88-107.
  • Price, A. & Barth, R.P. (1997). Shared Family Care: Child protection without parent-child separation. Protecting Children, 13(3), 15-16.
  • Barth, R.P. (1994). Shared Family Care: Child protection and family preservation. Social Work, 39(5), 515-524.
  • Barth, R.P. (1994). Shared foster family care. The Source, 4(1), 10-12. [PDF]
  • Nelson, K.M. (1992). Foster care…Not just for kids anymore: Use of whole family placement to reunite substance abusing parents and their children. The Source, 5(1), 3-5, 12.

Program Materials

The following materials were developed by the National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center, University of California at Berkeley.

 

Additional Resources

Additional Resources

  • Felsenfeld, P. (2004, March 17). Family foster care pays off for mom. Contra Costa Times.
  • Bernstein, N. (2004, January/February). Family reunions. Hope Magazine, 24-27.
  • Bower, A. (2003, February 17). Sharing family values. Time, 161(7), 62-63. [HTML]
  • Abdul-Alim, J. (2001, July 1). Foster care program keeps families intact [Electronic version]. Houston Chronicle. [HTML]
  • Abdul-Alim, J. (2001, June 27). Foster care plan keeps families together [Electronic version]. Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.
  • Author. (2001, June 23). Unique foster program begins. Milwaukee Courier.
  • Johnson, J.B. (2000, November 10). Something akin to family. San Francisco Chronicle.
  • Johnson, J.B. (2000, November 10). What it takes to be a mentor family. San Francisco Chronicle.
  • Kelley, M. (2000, October 1). Fostering parents. Colorado Springs - The Gazette, A1, A12, A13.
  • May, M. (1999, May 3). Learning to become a good parent. Contra Costa West County Times, A1, A8.
  • Chandler, K. (1995, January 16). Alternative foster care gives family a hand. Star Tribune, A1, A5.
  • Williams, L.M. & Barnyard, V.L. (1995). A New Life: An evaluation of a family reunification and child abuse prevention program for crack-addicted women and their children. Philadelphia, PA: Crime Prevention Association of Pennsylvania.
  • Nelson, K.M. (1992). Fostering homeless children and their parents too: The emergence of whole-family foster care. Child Welfare, 71(6), 575-584.
  • Cornish, J. (1992). Fostering homeless children and their parents too: A unique approach to transitional housing for homeless families. Community Alternatives: International Journal of Family Care, 4(2), 43-59.
  • Explanation of payments to Shared Family Care mentors, Innovative Family Partnerships, Inc., Milwaukee, WI. [PDF]
  • Shared Family Care, The California Evidence-Based Clearinghouse for Child Welfare, San Diego, CA. [HTML]
  • Shared Family Care Handbook, Innovative Family Partnerships, Inc., Milwaukee Shared Family Care Program. [PDF]
  • Wisconsin SFC Program Description, Innovative Family Partnerships, Inc., Milwaukee Shared Family Care Program, Milwaukee, WI. [PDF]
 

Public Policy

Public Policy

 

Links

Links

  • Humankind Public Radio: A story of two people from sharply different backgrounds who came together for a powerful purpose. In a living arrangement known as “shared family care,” a woman with a troubled past moved in for six months with her young child to the Antioch, California, home of a mentor and her children, for what amounted to a round-the-clock course in parenting.